Janus Isaac Nolasco and Katrina Navallo, Managing Editor and Editorial Associate, respectively, of Asian Studies met with Dr. Caroline Hau and Narumi Shitara, editor and managing editor, respectively, of Southeast Asian Studies, to initiate preliminary discussions concerning the implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the two journals. The meeting was held at the Kyoto University Center for Southeast Asian Studies on 11 July 2013. 

Signed earlier this year, the MOU covers the following areas:

  • Holding of joint academic conferences, seminars and workshops
  • Fostering a research culture
  • Supporting graduate students and early career academics
  • Publishing joint issues
  • Sharing of resources

Specific plans include collaborating on a joint issue on the ASEAN 2015, publishing call for papers in each other’s issues, and referrals for peer reviewers.  

 

Three recent issues of Asian Studies can now be downloaded for free at www.asj.upd.edu.ph

The special issue of Asian Studies, Backrooms, Battlefields, and Backhoes: The Mindanao Conundrum, comes nearly a year after the signing of the Bangsamoro Framework Agreement and amidst the ongoing negotiations between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. 

Published as Volume 48:1-2 (2012), the issue explores the various social, political, and historical issues that underpin “the Mindanao conundrum,” from treaties, peace agreements and economic development to clan violence, shadow economies, and Lumad self-determination. Not only does it cover Mindanao from different perspectives, it also points to the pressing need to address complex problems in the ongoing negotiations and beyond.
Three of the articles in this issue were presented at the UP Academic Congress in February 2010, while the rest were subsequently solicited. Download the PDF of the issue here. You may purchase a hard copy forPhP 400.) 


The Writings of Cesar Adib Majul Islam and Philippine Society: The Writings of Cesar Adib Majul commemorates one of the most brilliant minds in Philippine intellectual history. Released as Volume 46:1-2 (2010), this double issue reprints ten of Dr. Majul’s articles published in previous issues of Asian Studies over the past five decades. It contains five articles on Islam and Muslims in the Philippines, and another five on Filipino nationalism and the Philippine Reform Movement.

In his introduction, Julkipli Wadi, Dean of the Institute of Islamic Studies at the University of the Philippines, writes that the republication of Majul’s articles comes “auspiciously” after the signing of a Framework Agreement between the Philippine Government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. They offer a rich “historical canvas that can help determine the context and possible trajectories of the Framework’s vision of peace.” Download the PDF here. You may purchase a hard copy for PhP 300.


asian-studies-41-2-2005-coverPhilipppine History and Society in Retrospect reprints some of the landmark and pathbreaking research on Philippine history. Ricardo Jose, who wrote the introduction, says that these papers, written during the late 1960s and 1970s, "set set fresh standards on research methodologies and opened up new areas in the study of Philippine history and society....."

Unparalleled and still classic references in their fields, these papers inspired a generation of scholars. It is hoped that veteran academics can look back at these work and the historical context(s) in which they were written, perhaps with the benefit of hindsight; and that younger scholars can use these articles as a guide, if not inspiration, for their own research on Philippine history and society."

This retrospective issue, published as Volume 41:2 (2005), features the work of David Sturtevant, David Sweet, Benedict Kerkvliet, Jeremy Beckett, Michael Onorato, and William Henry Scott. Download the PDF here. You may purchase a hard copy for PhP 300. 


Costs exclude shipping rates. To order, please contact the editorial staff at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit our subscriptions page and kindly be guided by the instructions.

You may also drop by at Room 205, Hall of Wisdom, GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center to place your order and have it picked up within a few days. For further inquiries, please contact the editorial staffat This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Visit the Asian Studies website at www.asj.upd.edu.ph.

 

Yuko HiranoDr. Yuko Ohara-Hirano from Nagasaki University, Japan will be the guest editor of an upcoming special issue of the Asian Studies journal. The said issue, which will be devoted to the migration of Filipino nurses to Japan under the Japan-Philippines Economic Partnership Agreement (JPEPA), is slated for release sometime in mid-June 2014.

Asian Studies, a peer-reviewed journal by the Asian Center, University of the Philippines Diliman, has recently published Islam and Philippine Society: The Writings of Cesar Adib Majul, a double issue commemorating one of the most brilliant minds in Philippine intellectual history.

This volume reprints ten of Dr. Majul’s articles published in previous issues of Asian Studies over the past five decades. Released as a retrospective issue, it contains five articles on Islam and Muslims in the Philippines, and another five on Filipino nationalism and the Philippine Reform Movement.

These include The Role of Islam in the History of the Filipino People (1966); Islam in the Philippines and its China Link (1999); Social Background of Revolution (1971); and Principales, Ilustrados, Intellectuals and the Original Concept of a Filipino National Community(1977).  

In his introduction, Julkipli Wadi, Dean of the Institute of Islamic Studies at the University of the Philippines, writes that the republication of Majul’s articles comes “auspiciously” after the signing of a Framework Agreement between the Philippine Government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. They offer a rich “historical canvas that can help determine the context and possible trajectories of the Framework’s vision of peace.”

Moreover, the republication pays tribute to Dr. Majul’s seminal contribution to Philippine scholarship. He authored several books and penned numerous articles in reputable publications.  This voluminous body of work spans five decades, and covers groundbreaking studies in Philippine history, the sociopolitical thought of Apolinario Mabini, and the history of Islam and Muslims in the Philippines.

Educated in Cornell University, Dr. Majul occupied various academic and administrative positions in the University of the Philippines Diliman from the late 1940s to the late 1970s. He was once dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, which incorporated the now separate College of Arts and Letters, the College of Science, and the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy.  He passed away in October 2003.

Majul was an intellectual “giant,” says Asian Studies editor in chief, Eduardo C. Tadem, Ph.D. “We came out with this issue to allow veteran academics to look back at and reassess the significance of Dean Majul’s writings, perhaps with the benefit of hindsight. We also wanted to introduce new generations of scholars to his work, which is arguably unparalleled and relevant as ever.”

Asian Studies Co-Organizes 'A Conversation with Ben Anderson'

Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines, April 30, 2013  Benedict Richard O’Gorman Anderson, renowned and distinguished scholar of Southeast Asian studies, spoke at a special public forum at the Asian Center at UP Diliman on March 11. Participants from UP and other schools and universities attended the event. 

Entitled A Conversation with Benedict Anderson, the forum took the format of a panel interview conducted by four UP professors from different academic disciplines. The panel consisted of Prof. Eduardo T. Gonzalez of the Asian Center, Prof. Lily Rose Tope of Department of English and Comparative Literature (DECL), Prof. Ramon “Bomen” Guillermo of the Department of Filipino and Philippine Literature and Prof. Michiyo Yoneno-Reyes of the Asian Center.

Before a full house crowd of about 300 at the GT-Toyota Asian Cultural Center Auditorium, Anderson fielded questions on, among other issues, Southeast Asian regional identity; the link between literature, politics and nationhood; the relationship of the Philippines to Southeast Asia; the Filipino diaspora as part of the Filipino imagined community; prospects for socio-political change in the Philippines; and the link between the idea of imagined communities and Orientalism.  

Anderson is Professor Emeritus of International Studies, Government and Asian Studies at Cornell University. He is best known for Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, which was first published in 1983 but has since undergone countless editions. The book is a path-breaking and highly innovative work that has supplied one of the most popular and oft-quoted concepts in the academe and beyond. His other books include The Spectre of Comparisons (1998); Under Three Flags: Anarchism and the Anti-colonial Imagination (2007); and The Fate of Rural Hell: Asceticism and Desire in Buddhist Thailand (2012).

Anderson discussed his intellectual development, which involved reading philosophy and literature, among others.  His was one of the last generations reared on classical (Greek and Latin) education.  This exposure to the literary, in the broadest sense of the word, proved to be a huge influence on his political ideas. Indeed, when asked whether literature has been effectively used to create a sense of nation, he explained how his fascination with the subject, along with language, shaped his analysis of nationalism and nation-building. He read the Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo in the original Spanish to dissect how people thought of the nation and how their perception related to their own historical situation.

On nation-building, Anderson named two primary social elements that play into and influence the development of a sense of nationality: language and geography. Discussing the former, he compared the Philippines to Indonesia, both of which are composed of different ethnic groups with their own languages. The Philippine state, however, had inadequate power to “instill one unifying language,” which inadvertently led to preservation of various ethnic languages. In contrast, the Indonesian state intensely and successfully promoted a national lingua franca, a project that effectively marginalized many ethnic dialects. The concept of boundary, on the other hand, involves an imagined geography, which can expand or shrink through conquest or colonization.

Anderson also shared his thoughts on the Philippines as part of Southeast Asia. He said although the country has experiences of colonialism similar to that of other Southeast Asian states, the Philippines has stood out because of the deep influence of Spanish culture and “commitment to Catholicism.” Indeed, one feature that sets the country apart, according to Anderson, is that the Philippines has not legalized divorce.

The forum was organized by the Asian Center in partnership with the Asian Politics & Policy journal (Wiley-Blackwell/PSO); the Asian Studies journal; the DECL; the UP Department of Political Science; and the UP Third World Studies Center (TWSC).  The interview will be published by Asian Politics & Policy later this year, but a video recording has been posted on the blog of the TWSC (http://uptwsc.blogspot.com/). — Asian Center